What is Fluxus (by Mark Bloch, July 9, 2012)

Fluxus was an international group of thinkers, artists, composers, performers and designers that first networked themselves together in the late 1950s, then became a performance collective when they took their name in 1962, then a way of working with time and materials and eventually an art movement creating work in several dimensions and media that lasted from the early 60s through the late 70s and beyond on three continents, blazing the aesthetic trails that were to define the next half century of art history. They shattered old aesthetic boundaries and explored new ones, while grappling internally with their communal identity, under the guidance of their own conflicting, shifting, and morphing opinions of who they were and what they were up to as both a group and as individuals, without clear or firm parameters of what criteria might define their association. They ebbed and flowed as a collective, against the odds, disappearing and reemerging like a simple but mysterious prop in a magician’s routine, through schisms, chasms, reorganizations and excommunications.

Many members are now gone, some deceased, some scurrying away quietly in the night under the radar with others lionized in enormous spotlights in life and in death, with the final few, more than a handful, still amongst us today, creating dynamic new senior citizen fluxworks or as in the case of the youngest members, now in very late middle age, finally enjoying their occasional new-found status as Old Masters, dog-tired “concept” artists who taught a very old art world a few new tricks.

Fluxus has always defied traditions by establishing new ones, transcended geographical limitations by staking out unfamiliar territory, and most importantly by virtually fusing together in deceptively simple ways all the medium-based approaches of the middle 20th Century, creating entirely new genres that we take for granted today out of the old ones as a replacement status quo for a New Millennium. Fluxus participants were among the first to embrace a “do-it-yourself” mindset, exposing process as superior to end products while producing startling and surprising results, circumventing existing institutions by utilizing everyday objects, approaches and activities to successfully blur boundaries between art and life.

George Maciunas, a made-to-order autocrat for his times and the group’s Lithuanian-born gatekeeper and visionary czar, instigated and organized art experiences as a collaborative social process, breathing new creativity into an established art world that slowly came to accept the group’s contributions not only as valid but as important and essential to the changing times. Maciunas and the other Fluxus artists he attempted to control, individually and en masse, created thought-provoking works that turned an elusive, ephemeral approach to shaping ethereal forces of anarchy into playful manifestations of art “product” existing in two and three dimensions or as events in time, captured and frozen by their instructions and posters or in beautiful photographs or by-products. They created art that resonated like poems for their times or like zen koans producing a series of aftershocks more akin to spiritual experiences or thrills had in any amusement park or both than to the conventional aesthetics and other familiar goings on in the staid commercial art world. They delivered work that goosed their audiences or tickled onlookers with subtle punch lines that forced their creative contemporaries and the public at large to approach life in the decades since, whether they knew it or not, with a freshly minted Fluxus attitude of their own that they themselves slyly assumed they had invented.

But Fluxus had bubbled up from within and rendered an art world constitutionally unprepared to assimilate it, defenseless against its playful reach. Fifty years ago, Fluxus began to prepare the fertile ground required for a completely transformed art world to emerge in another century and they did so elegantly, admirably and without much hype or fanfare.

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Fluxfest Chicago: Begins Tomorrow!

Here’s the skinny on where you’ll find it happening.

Fluxfest Chicago 2015 Schedule of Events:

Thursday, Feb 19, 4-8pm: “Kiss” reception (secret location, call 314-276-4802 Day of Event for details)
Friday, Feb 20, 12-5pm: Chicago Fluxus Day (Chicago Cultural Center)
Friday, Feb 20, 7-?pm: New York Correspondance Dinner of Chicago (Berghoff’s)
Saturday, Feb 21, 7-10pm: A Flux -Evening, (6018 North)
Sunday, Feb 22, 12-5pm: Listening party, (6018 North)

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Fluxus Pixie Powder

Get it while you can! Cures all pschogenic illnesses. Even cyanosmurfism!

Genuine Authentic Fluxus Pixie Powder

Genuine Authentic Fluxus Pixie Powder

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Fluxfest 2015 Chicago Poster

Fluxfest 2015, Chicago - February 19-22

Fluxfest 2015, Chicago – February 19-22

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Fluxfest Chicago 2015

Dates are now confirmed for this year’s annual Chicago Fluxfest.

Thursday, February 19 through Sunday, February 22.

Nearby Hotels include (in order of price in CDN$)

The poster and more details will be posted as soon as they become available.

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From the Fluxus Reader

Maybe you think Fluxus still lives and you would like to textualise its progress and historical relevance – should you be obliged to read everything written and also look at each and every one of Peter Moore’s 350,000 photographs?

~ Larry Miller

————- and;

…there are some points in common among most Fluxworks:
1 internationalism, 2 experimentalism and iconoclasm, 3 intermedia, 4 minimalism or concentration, 5 an attempted resolution of the art/life dichotomy, 6 implicativeness, 7 play or gags, 8 ephemerality, and 9 specificity.

[…]

Every so often there is a new upsurge of interest in Fluxus. At such times those who were not in the original Fluxus group will present themselves as Fluxartists. The best way of verifying their claims is, of course, to match them against the criteria. The more criteria they match, the more right they have to be included as Fluxartists in projects.

~ Dick Higgins

Free Digital Edition of the Fluxus Reader, edited by Ken Friedman
http://www.artandeducation.net/announcement/fluxus-reader-free-digital-edition/

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Let’s talk about Fluxus…

Or, What I Learned That Fluxus Was/Is/Isn’t/Might be/Should be/Could be

We could start with Dada. Some people have called Fluxus “neodada”. Some have called contemporary Fluxus neodada. Those people are wrong. So we won’t start with Dada.

Let’s start instead with John Cage. John Cage was not a Fluxus artist, and he had nothing directly to do with the founding of Fluxus. But he had one really cool idea that made Fluxus (and most art of every kind after his idea) possible. Cage realized that music (he was a composer) was all just sound waves in air. It wasn’t flutes, or pianos, or violins, or treble clefs and bass clefs, or 4/4 time or 3/4 time. It was just waves moving through the atmosphere at frequencies audible to the human ear. Most music was composed so that the composer or musician’s organization of the sound waves would bring pleasure to most of the composer/musician’s cultural contemporaries. But it didn’t have to. A composer, or musician, or artist could organize sound waves in whatever way they wanted, and they could use whatever tools they wanted to, to organize those sound waves. It wasn’t a great leap from there to the idea that visual art was subject to the same thinking. All visual art consisted of marks and forms, organized on surfaces or in space, and any artist could choose how to organize their marks and forms, and what tools to use to do so.

In the early 1960s a group of artists, led mostly by George Maciunas and Dick Higgins coalesced around the idea of Intermedia. The idea that art created in the spaces in which different media intersect would be more interesting than art confined to any single medium. George organized the first ever Fluxus Festival in Wiesbaden, Germany in 1962. For more than a decade after that ,the core group of artists were bound together by a relatively held-in-common artistic vision. The first manifesto was published by Maciunas, and subsequent manifestos of varying degrees of influence were published subsequently. The salient point is that, at least until the death of Maciunas in 1978, the IDEA of Fluxus and the PEOPLE of Fluxus were one and the same.

Then things get complicated…

As long as the idea and the people were one and the same, nobody had to think much about what would happen to the idea, once the people moved on to other things, places, or states-of-being. But Fluxus turned out to be a pretty darned good idea, and it was an especially good idea for artists that were either interested in working in intermedia, and artists who were not particularly interested in participating in the machinations of the Art World and its hyperactive commercialism, power politics, and money games.

Inevitably, a new cohort of artists emerged who had either loose affiliations, or no affiliation with the original group of Fluxus artists, but were deeply committed to the Fluxus ideas and ideals. Many of these artists consider their association to the Fluxus ideas to be deep enough to refer to themselves as “Fluxus artists”. These artists often point to statements by the original Fluxus artists, that make it very clear that they never considered Fluxus to be an art movement in the traditional art-historical sense, or as a “closed group” of artists whose participation in Fluxus required consent. In the words of Fluxus artist and historian, Ken Friedman,

“Dick [Higgins] explicitly rejected a notion that limited Fluxus to a specific group of people who came together at a specific time and place. Dick wrote, “Fluxus is not a moment in history, or an art movement. Fluxus is a way of doing things, a tradition, and a way of life and death.” ” http://www.iade.pt/designist/issues/001_07.html

Sadly, with the passage of time, it seems that some of the early Fluxus artists, perhaps feeling insecure about their own art-historical legacies, have taken to rewriting history: Doing so in a way that is simultaneously more favourable to the seriously moneyed art collector class, and to their perceived legacies. Seems, it turns out, that being part of an important art history movement pays higher dividends, than being an artist in the dwindling dusk of a lifetime, with nothing of consequence to show besides those spring days. In turn, this has led to a rather pathetic withdraw of support for the very artists most interested in preserving and honoring the legacy and work of the founding group of Fluxus artists.

Personally, I believe that the work and ideas of the leading Fluxus artists of the 1960s will easily withstand the tests of time. The artists who were footnotes then, will still be footnotes later. I also believe that the best way to be more than a footnote, would be for the surviving early Fluxus artists to embrace and participate in the new Fluxfests with the current generation of Fluxus artists. And those of us in that current generation, what of our artistic legacy? Most of us are too busy creating interesting, new, Fluxus artworks to worry about it!

PS: A HUGE shoutout to Yoko Ono is due here. Not only was she one of the most interesting and influential original Fluxus artists but she continues to support Fluxus Art and artists past, present, and future.

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THE CAVELLINI FESTIVAL IN NYC | November 14-16, 2014

THE CAVELLINI FESTIVAL IN NYC
3 day celebration of Guglielmo Achille Cavellini Nov. 14 to 16 to
celebrate GAC's centennial 1914-2014
cavellini-NYC-sticker
Friday night November 14
530 pm to 730 pm

Reception at Museum of Modern Art library to see their mailings received
from Cavellini and to celebrate him and to look at their current mail art
historical show called "Analog Network."
Museum of Modern Art, Cullman Education Building, 4 W 54 St., New York.

Saturday November 15
10 am

Meet and go to the various museums around town and unfurl a Cavellini
1914-2014 banner for the purposes of self-historification.
Meet at Guggenheim Museum at 10 am.

12 to 2 pm

Richard L. Feigen & Co. viewing of "Ray Johnson's Art World" exhibition
with their archivist, Diana Bowers.
34 E 69th St, New York, NY.

3 to 5pm

Lynch Tham, a gallery on the Lower East Side presents a centennial
exhibition of works of Cavellini from his estate and some performances.
175 Rivington Street, New York, NY.

6-10 pm

Whitebox Art Center Lower East Side for a mail art show in honor of GAC.
Opening, performances and poetry readings.
329 Broome Street, New York, NY.


Whitebox and Lynch Tham Performance Lineup:
Performances by:
Mark Bloch | Britta Wheeler as Belinda Powell | William Evertson from
Easthampton, Connecticut Giovanni and Renatta Strada from Ravenna, Italy |
Pasha Radetzki from the Republic of Belarus

Poetry by
Valery Oisteanu | Steve Dalachinsky | Yuko Otomo | Ron Kolm | Bonny Finberg
 Jeffrey Cyphers Wright | Allan Graubard

Music by
Antonello Parisi (piano rhodes) with Michael Gam (bass) and Julieta
Eugenio (tenor sax)

Video by
Richard Kostelanetz | Galeazzo Nardini and the Italian Museum | Jennifer
Weigel
Guglielmo Achille Cavellini and others

Sunday November 16

9:30 am New York Correspondence Brunch Meeting in honor of Cavellini and
Ray Johnson and also Buster Cleveland, John Evans, Dick Higgins, David
Cole, Fernand Barbot, Carlo Pittore and other late New York mail artists
at Katz's Deli.
205 E. Houston St, New York, NY.



3 day celebration of Cavellini Nov. 14 to 16 to celebrate GAC 1914-2014.
Organized by Mark Bloch
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Fluxfest Chicago 2014

The annual Chicago Fluxfest took place in February of this year, from the 20th to the 23rd.

fluxfest2014

For a peak at what went on, check out the Fluxfest Scrapbook put together by Mary Campbell.

https://archive.org/details/fluxfest2014

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Fluxfest Chicago 2013

Fluxfest Chicago 2013 Poster

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FLUXFEST CHICAGO – FEB 21 -24 – IT’S HAPPENING!

IT’S HAPPENING
FLUXFEST CHICAGO
FEB 21 -24

Feb 21 – Thurs evening
Mail Art Exhibit
School of the Art Institute Library
Wabash Ave

Feb 22 -Friday
Performances @ The Defibulator
12-5

Feb 23 Saturday
Chicago Cultural Center
Michigan Ave between Washington & Randolph St
Performances
Mail Art 0- Film Fest
12-5

6PM Dinner at The Berghoff

Feb 24 Sunday
6018 Gallery
6018 N Kenmore
Mail Art Exhibit and Final Get together

Start making your plans for the works you want to perform
notify your friends and family and enemies
FLUXFEST CHICAGO IS HAPPENING!!!

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Twelve12project

Twelve12project

To occur simultaneously worldwide at 12/12/12/12/12  (12:12 PM on December 12, 2012)

The goal is to get as many people on the planet as possible to create something for one minute at the same time – on 12 December 2012 at 12:12 (12/12/12/12/12)! To allow for some flexibility for more people to participate, your minute of creation can be in the am (00:12) or pm (12:12), but let’s make it be Eastern Time Zone – a New York Minute (GMT – 5 Hours) so we are all creating at the same two minutes on earth.

Draw something, write a song, improvise a piece of music, take a picture (or many pictures), write a poem, create a recipe – use your imagination…but make sure that you limit your work to only that one minute as a way to shape, guide and limit this project.
The act of a simultaneous moment of creation is the goal but, if you would like to share your work, please upload it to this site (make sure to record any performing arts) – that’s it!
Create!

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Twelve12project/199529353517519

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Call for ReSite Submissions, get in the next issue!

ReSite is an assembling publication where pages have an element of audience participation or interaction. ReSite is part of the tradition of Fluxus editions where anyone can perform a Fluxus action or score. In addition to this performance-based approach, ReSite taps into the rich tradition of the avant-garde with contributions of manifestos and documentation of art actions.

Call for submissions to ReSite
Send 40 copies size 21cm x14.8cm (A5). Please leave 2cms on the left hand side for binding. Works can be double sided and can be more than one page. Copies should be flat and landscape format. Pages will be wire-bound. ReSite is an on going project. Each issue holds 20 contributions. Copy sent to all.

Send to: Field Study, P0 Box 1838 Geelong, VIC 3220 Australia

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Seventh Annual NY Art Book Fair

Printed Matter presents the seventh annual NY Art Book Fair, from September 28 to 30, at MoMA PS1, Long Island City, Queens. A preview will be held on the evening of Thursday, September 27.

http://nyartbookfair.com/about

Over 15,000 artists, book buyers, collectors, dealers, curators, independent publishers, and other enthusiasts attended the NY Art Book Fair in 2011.

Hours and Location
The NY Art Book Fair is free and open to the public.

Preview: Thursday, September 27, 6–9 pm
Friday, September 28, 12 pm–7 pm
Saturday, September 29, 11 am–9 pm
Sunday, September 30, 11 am–7 pm

MoMA PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue at 46th Avenue
Long Island City, NY (map)

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At MoMA: Exquisite Corpses: Drawing and Disfiguration

With the hype surrounding the Cindy Sherman blockbuster retrospective on the 6th floor, which critics have almost unanimously praised, I was surprised to find that the most invigorating, exciting and generally mind-blowing exhibition at MoMA right now is Exquisite Corpses: Drawing and Disfiguration, a small drawing show on the third floor.

Proving the continued importance and relevance of Surrealist art, Exquisite Corpses demonstrates that exhibitions do not have to be the biggest or display the hottest contemporary artist to be invigorating. These works easily delve into important artistic issues about the representation of not only the human figure but also the thoughts, emotions, sexuality and experiences contained within it.

The exquisite corpse drawings of the Surrealists were basically an artistic game that invited different artists to take turns drawing a part of the body until it is complete. The result distorts and twists the figure into something I think can be more psychologically true to the human form than academic figure drawing. The works in Exquisite Corpses range from original Surrealist pieces from the 1920s to later work by Georges Bataille, Louise Bourgeoise, Jackson Pollock and contemporary artists such as George Condo and Marcel Dzarma.

Full article on Hyperallergic.com

Cadavre Exquis with Yves Tanguy, Joan Miró, Max Morise, and Man Ray, "Nude" (1926-27), composite drawing of ink, pencil, and colored pencil on paper (via moma.org)

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Ay-O: Over the Rainbow Once More

 

Museum of Contemporary
Art Tokyo

 A-Yo image  

 

Ay-O: Over the Rainbow Once More
4 February–6 May 2012

Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo
4-1-1 Miyoshi, Koto-ku
Tokyo 135-0022 Japan

www.mot-art-museum.jp 

Ay-O, “My 192 Friends,” 2011. 
Ay-O: Over the Rainbow Once More 

Discover the vibrant world of Ay-O through this retrospective of his work, covering his entire career, from his early works to the present day.

Born in Ibaraki Prefecture in 1931, Ay-O, together with Masuo Ikeda and others, was active in the Demokrato Artists Association during the fifties, attracting notice for his brightly-colored oil paintings. In 1958 he moved to New York, where he used tangible objects to try to create dialogues with the world that can be perceived through the senses, resulting in his ‘finger boxes’, in which a finger is inserted into a hole in the side of a box to feel the material hidden inside, installation works that incorporate their surrounding environment, etc., going beyond the confines of the painting to produce works that appeal to the five senses. During the sixties, when everyday things or actions were translated into art, Ay-O received attention for his pioneering installations that he called ‘environments’. As a member of the Fluxus movement, which went beyond the narrow divisions of genre to include musicians, poets and artists, its activities extending to performances and printed works to establish the foundations of today’s diversity of art, he worked with such people as Yoko Ono and Nam June Paik. Finally, he rebelled against the concept of creating works consisting of lines, instead filling his motifs with the colors of the spectrum, from red to purple, giving birth to his ‘rainbow’ works, becoming famous throughout the world as the ‘rainbow artist’ subsequent to his exhibition at the 1966 Venice Biennale. Ay-O’s struggle with the rainbow was expressed in a variety of genres including prints, paintings and installations, and still continues to the present day. This is the largest-ever exhibition to be held of his work, presenting numerous paintings from the rainbow series, an interactive installation that people are invited to appreciate through touch, a new work that is 30 meters in length and contains a rainbow consisting of 192 colors, a 300 meters long banner that was suspended from the Eiffel Tower in 1987 and recordings of his performance works. The gallery will overflow with Ay-O’s optimistic world.

Curator:
Mihoko Nishikawa (Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo)

Organized by:
Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo
The Yomiuri Shimbun
The Japan Association of Art Museums

Exhibition Catalogue:
To be published in March 2012.
New and past text by Ay-O
English-Japanese bilingual

Press Contact:
Mutsu Yoshikawa
m-yoshikawa@mot-art.jp

Reiko Noguchi
r-noguchi@mot-art.jp
T +81(0)3-5245-1134(Direct)
F +81(0)3-5245-1141

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Yoko Ono: Imagine Peace for Fluxfest Chicago

http://imaginepeace.com/archives/16853

Nice plug from Yoko for contemporary Fluxus. Now… If only she would grace us with a surprise visit too! Wouldn’t that be sweet?

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Fluxfest Chicago 2012 – Poster and Schedule


 

FLUXFEST CHICAGO 2012

February 9th – 12th, 2012

Feb 9th 5:00pm – 7:30pm
FROM THE ARCHIVE
Mailart and Fluxus from the archives of Fluxus/St. Louis.
Opening reception
Chicago Art Institute, Joan Flasch Artists Book Collection. 37 S. Wabash, 5th Floor.

Feb 10th 2:00pm – 5pm
FLUX IT YOURSELF
Scores and Performances by Contemporary Fluxus.
Publication Exposition and live performances Coordinated by Fluxpress.
Columbia College Center For Book and Paper Arts ,1104 S. Wabash Av.

Feb 10th 6:00pm
Flux Dinner
The Artist’s Cafe, 412 S. Michigan Av.

Feb 11th 11:00am-5:00pm
Fluxus Day at the Chicago Cultural Center
Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E. Washington St., 2nd Floor.

Feb 11th 11:00am – 5:00pm
Mailart Creation Station
An ongoing space with supplies for making and sending Mailart, informing and interacting with the public.
Coordinated by Stampland, Neosho, and Adamandia Kapsalis.

Feb 11th 12:00pm – 5:00pm
Fluxhibition 5.4
small flux-works will travel from the Fluxmuseum Collection to be shown and shared for the day.
Coordinated by Cecil Touchon and the Fluxmuseum.

Feb 11th 12:00pm – 5:00pm
Flux Free For All
over 2000 small fluxworks from postcards to stamps and small objects to be given away … take what you wish.

Feb 11th 1:00pm –1:45pm
Women In Bowlers
a celebration of the women of Fluxus – from its beginnings till now, Coordinated by Picasso Gaglione with Dada Machine Fluxus.

Feb 11th 2:00pm – 2:45pm
Long Form Flux
Longer performance pieces happening throughout the hallways stairwells and niches of the Cultural Center .

Feb 11th 3:00pm – 3:45pm
Be Blank Consort
Avant poetry performance Coordinated by John M. Bennett.

Feb 11th 4:00pm – 5:00pm
One Ring Circus
Contemporary Fluxus scores performed under the G.A.R. dome.

ongoing (8:00am – 6:00pm)
Write Now – Artists And Letterforms
A major exhibition that showcases a diverse range of recent works by artists utilizing letters and text in a wide array of mediums.

ongoing (8:00am – 6:00pm)
The Fluxus, Mailart, and Visual Poetry Project
coordinated by Keith A. Buchholz, is located on and around a 30 ft. long wall as part of this exhibition, and will be open during the day.
Exhibition curated by Nathan Mason.

Feb 11th 6:30 pm
The New York Correspondence School of Chicago Dinner
The Berghoff 17 W. Adams
An extension of Ray Johnson’s historic New York Correspondence School Meetings,
The Berghoff once again welcomes us for a special meal … Bring Mail art Multiples to share and swap. Hosted by The New York Correspondence School of Chicago.

Feb 12th 12:00pm – 4:00pm
FLUX FILM FEST
6018 NORTH, 6018 N. Kenmore, in the Edgewater Neighborhood.
A matinee festival of New Fluxus Film
with a special screening of RE: MACIUNAS a new film by Jonas Mekas – Made for the Lithuanian Biennial. Also, an opportunity to explore 6018 NORTH – a new grassroots non-profit arts center for Performance, Sound, and Alternative Art.
Coordinated by Tricia Van Eck, 6018 North, Andrew Oleksiuk, and Fluxus STL Archive.

This FLUXFEST is Organized by Keith A. Buchholz, and The Contemporary Fluxus Community.
For Further info contact Keith at:
Keith9963@sbcglobal.net
or phone 314-276-4802

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Fluxfest 2012 – Chicago

February 9th – 12th, 2012
International Fluxus is gearing up for 4 days of performance and activity in Chicago this February, and are hoping that everyone who can, will join in the festival. If you can’t make it in person, we’d still love to have you included. Please send a score that could be performed, or a simple multiple in an edition of 50 or more that we can give away. More details below …

FLUXFEST CHICAGO 2012 February 9th – 12th, 2012

Feb 9th – Opening of FROM THE ARCHIVE – Mailart and Fluxus from the archives of Fluxus/St. Louis.
@ Chicago Art Institute, Joan Flasch Library.
An afternoon opening reception for an exhibit of works that have accumulated at the archive ( if you’ve never sent Mailart or anything to the archive ..send it now and Keith will make sure it’s included in the show )

Feb. 10th . FLUX IT YOURSELF : Scores and Performances by Contemporary Fluxus

Tentative Location : Center For Book Arts, Chicago ( kind of a DIY free for all, where we can do whatever scores we like, plus a one day long exposition of publications ) either send publications to Keith Buchholz ahead of time, or bring them along.

Feb 10th 6:00pm “Flux Dinner” @ The Artist’s Cafe, Chicago
An informal get together at a Chicago landmark …. also an opportunity to sign posters and catch up with each other.

Feb 11th 11-5pm Fluxus Day at the Chicago Cultural Center
an amazing performance space, and an event sponsored by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events.

PLUS several events to participate in …

  1. Mailart Creation Station – an ongoing space with supplies for making and sending Mailart, informing and interacting with the public.
  2. Women In Bowlers – a celebration of the women of Fluxus – from its beginnings till now, coordinated by Picasso Gaglione with Dada Machine Fluxus, and everyone who wants to perform.
  3. One Ring Circus – Contemporary Fluxus scores performed by taking turns … I’ll be there with a sign up sheet, and announce ( like we did last year at the MCA and at ABC No Rio ) ….
  4. Long Form Flux – Plenty of room for longer durational pieces to be ongoing .. Let me know what you want to do & we’ll work it in … we have lots of space to work with,
    also hallways and stairwells … Bring your Ideas
  5. Fluxhibition 5.4 – Cecil Touchon will once again transport valises filled with small flux-works from the Fluxmuseum Collection to show and share for the day.
  6. Free For All – Please either bring or send ahead a multiple, publication or postcard in an edition of 50 or more that can be given away to the public. Last year was amazing .. over 50 different pieces came in, and all were distributed … that’s 2500 works that went out in a day ….how cool is that! I’ll be collecting 8 full sets to box and donate to archives. ( Last years boxes ended up in MOMA, Ohio State, The Sackner Collection, Chicago Art Institute, MCA Chicago, and more…. )

Feb. 11th ongoing ( 8am – 6pm ) Write Now – Artists And Letterforms

A major exhibition at the Chicago Cultural Center that showcases a diverse range of recent works by artists utilizing letters and text in a wide array of mediums. * The ” Fluxus, Mailart, and Visual Poetry Project ” that many of us are in, is located on and around a 30 ft. long wall as part of this exhibition, and will be open during the day.

Feb 11th 6:30 pm – The New York Correspondence School of Chicago Dinner

The Berghoff, host restaurant of last year’s Correspondence Dinner, once again
welcomes us for a special meal … Bring Mail art and Multiples to share and swap.

Feb 12th ” Flux Film Fest ” @ 6018 NORTH.

A matinee festival of New Fluxus Film ( send me your film work now on DVD, so we can get the schedule set up. ) with a special screening of RE: MACIUNAS a new film by Jonas Mekas – Made for us for the Lithuanian Biennial. Also, an opportunity to explore 6018 NORTH – a new grassroots non-profit arts center for Performance, Sound, and Alternative Art .. this amazing space is in process, and will become the new Public Home of the Mailart / Fluxus archive that I’ve been accumulating … (by next year our Archive Space will be completed, with a viewing room for Mailart / Fluxus works and publications, and walls to do special exhibitions from the archive.

* If you’re sending works ahead of time please

Clearly Mark them as for Fluxfest / Chicago.

* send to this address:

Fluxfest Chicago

c/o Keith A. Buchholz

3449 Hartford St.
St. Louis, Mo.

63118

U.S.A.

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What is Fluxus? What is not?

There have never been really solid lines demarking where Fluxus starts and stops.

To my mind there are some things that are clearly Fluxus and others that are clearly not Fluxus, but there is a heck of a lot of grey in between. For example, I am not currently aware of any pure audio art (sound art without a background event score or visible performers) that was made or exhibited during the first Fluxus era. But I think that sound art is the ultimate expression of Intermedia, and Intermedia is/was fundamental to understanding Fluxus.

The writing of event scores, performance of event scores, fluxboxes, fluxkits, and the type of work typically included in a fluxbox (visual poetry, experimental poetry, drawings and texts, small found objects and multiples) probably constituted the majority of work that could easily be classified as Fluxus. But even in the first Fluxus era, the scope of Intermedia and work presented as Fluxus by its practitioners extended beyond those forms.

In the era of the Internet the world of Intermedia has become the new normal. It seems only natural that the combination of technical media intersections and online social networking should lead to a renaissance of new Fluxus that while not the same as the old Fluxus, is never-the-less a natural extension of it. I believe that the group of artists that I am associated with is a natural extension of Fluxus, and that we are indeed a legitimate new Fluxus community.

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Fluxus Weekend in NYC (November 11, 2011)

In the spirit of Fluxus, Performa will produce an intensive 52-hour program (Friday, November 11, 5:00 pm) across New York City, collaborating with members of the Performa Consortium. A five-part program will be presented in several key Fluxus forms, honoring the history and prompting the making of new Fluxus actions, objects, music, film, and ideas for the twenty-first century. The projects, ranging in size from large events to small-scale gestures, will be concentrated in downtown Manhattan in tribute to Fluxus history, and to George Maciunas and the Fluxus pioneers who lived and worked there.

Organized by Mark Beasley, Esa Nickle, Lana Wilson, and Biennial Consortium members with Liutauras Psibilskis.

Information courtesy of Mary Campbell

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Ralph Waldo Emerson and Fluxus?

I ask not for the great, the remote, the romantic … I embrace the common, I explore and sit at the feet of the familiar, the low. Give me insight into today, and you may have the antique and future worlds.

The quote above is from Ralph Waldo Emerson, as found in Ken Friedman‘s essay, Fluxus: A Laboratory of Ideas, in the exhibition catalog for Fluxus and the Essential Questions of Life, currently on view at the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College.

While I am far from certain about how Ralph Waldo would react in the presence of Fluxus activity, he does seem to foreshadow and important element of the Fluxus philosophy. His is perhaps a more eloquent version of one of my own quick catchphrase explanations of Flluxus… “Fluxus makes the mundane magical”. Of course, Emerson was speaking about Fluxus in 1837, more that a hundred years before Fluxus even formally existed!

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Fluxus dead or alive (again)

The Fluxus dead or alive argument is simpler than many people on both sides make it out to be.

Fluxus was a group of artists in the 60s and 70s. The group largely disbanded after Maciunas died. Ergo Fluxus is dead.

BUT… That group of artists set an idea in motion. That idea (or attitude) is Fluxus. The Fluxus idea, attitude and way of being and artmaking is as relevant today as it was then. Ergo Fluxus lives.

I can see the attraction of the first statement for those whose primary objective is to profit from Fluxus, but  ss a living, breathing, Fluxus practioner, it seems pretty obvious to me thatthe second statement is more accurate.

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Exhibition: Fluxus and the Essential Questions of Life

Fluxus and the Essential Questions of Life

April 16–August 7, 2011
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu
hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu

One of the things—maybe the most important thing—that art is good for is thinking about life. Fluxus and the Essential Questions of Life, a major traveling exhibition based on the Hood Museum of Art’s George Maciunas Memorial Collection of Fluxus art, is designed for visitors to experience the radical and influential cultural development that was Fluxus, and maybe learn something about themselves along the way. Fluxus was an international network of artists, composers, and designers that emerged as an art (or “anti-art”) phenomenon in the early 1960s and was noted for blurring the boundaries between art and life.
Fluxus and the Essential Questions of Life takes Maciunas’s approach toward art as part of a social process as it’s touchstone. The exhibition is about how Fluxus works, and it encourages visitor interpretation and response through its design and layout. Over one hundred works by Maciunas and other Fluxus artists, including, among many others, George Brecht, Ben Vautier, Yoko Ono, Robert Filliou, Nam June Paik, La Monte Young, Mieko Shiomi, and Ken Friedman, playfully supply answers to fourteen themes, framed as questions, such as “What Am I?,” “Happiness?,” “Health?,” “Freedom?,” and “Danger?” A free newspaper containing a map of the exhibition will allow visitors to go directly to those questions of most pressing interest to themselves.
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Fluxfest New York City: April 2011

NYC Fluxfest 2011 Poster

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